London Borough of Bromley Local Plan Online

London Borough of Bromley | Welcome | Written Statement - Contents | Written Statement - Index of Policies | Proposals Map | Contact Us | Help

You are here: London Borough of Bromley > Interactive Unitary Development Plan > Written Statement - 8. GREEN BELT AND OPEN SPACE

8. GREEN BELT AND OPEN SPACE

 

OBJECTIVES:

  1. To protect the Green Belt, Metropolitan Open Land and the Green Chain from inappropriate development, encourage greater access, and promote their use for outdoor recreation.
  2. To enhance land designated as Green Belt and Metropolitan Open Land through active management and advice.
  3. To protect Urban Open Space, and encourage its enhancement
  4. To preserve good quality agricultural land as a valuable resource and promote sustainable farming, forestry or horticultural practices
  5. To have regard to the strategic requirements for minerals, and the need for them to be worked where they are found, but to balance this need against other strategic functions currently fulfilled by the Green Belt

8.1 The Borough is fortunate in having within its boundaries an extensive area of open countryside forming part of London's Green Belt. This Green Belt land covers over 7,700 ha and represents more than half of the Borough's total area. The open and attractive appearance of the Green Belt is in some respects the result of the stringent application of policies that curb inappropriate development. It is important that the UDP should continue to express the ideals embodied in these policies, whilst adopting a positive view to their application.

8.2 Within the urban area there are numerous open spaces, both public and private, which provide for outdoor recreation and leisure. They also perform an important function by creating breaks in the built-up area, thus contributing significantly to Bromley's pleasant residential environment.

STRATEGIC CONSIDERATIONS

8.3 The London Plan restates in essence the four purposes of the Green Belt listed in PPG2: to check the unrestricted sprawl of large built-up areas; to prevent neighbouring towns from merging into one another; to assist in safeguarding the countryside from encroachment; and to assist in urban regeneration by encouraging the recycling of derelict and other urban land. Its role in providing access to open countryside for Londoners is also recognised (para 3.247). In the Green Belt, there is a presumption against inappropriate development unless very special circumstances can be demonstrated (PPG2 para 3.2).

8.4 Whilst the London Plan makes reference to ‘national guidance’, in respect of land use planning in rural areas, it does not refer to PPS7 specifically. PPS7 states that whilst the policies in PPG2 continue to apply in Green Belts, planning authorities should ensure that planning policies address the particular land use issues and opportunities to be found in the countryside around all urban areas.

8.5 PPS7 requires that the best agricultural land be regarded as a national resource and protected from irreversible development (this protection is embodied in Policy 3D.14 of the London Plan).

8.6 The Metropolitan Open Land (MOL) designation is unique to London, and protects strategically important open spaces within the built environment. Although MOL may vary in size and primary function in different parts of London, it should be of strategic significance, for example by serving a wide catchment area or drawing visitors from several boroughs (London Plan para 3.248). The presumption against inappropriate development which applies in the Green Belt, applies equally to MOL (London Plan Policy 3D.9 & paras 3.248 & 3.249). In accordance with PPG17, the Council intends to give protection to open space and sports and recreation facilities that are of high quality or of particular value to a local community, through the application of its policies.

8.7 The London Plan also refers to green chains (para. 3.250), it states that ‘they are important to London’s open space network, recreation and biodiversity. They consist of footpaths and the open spaces that they link, which are accessible to the public. Because of their London wide significance, it also advises that green chains and links within them be designated MOL (para 3.250).

8.8 Other open spaces that are part of the urban structure, but which are of only local significance are designated Urban Open Space in this plan.

8.9 Chapter 4 of the London Plan recognises the strategic need for minerals within London, particularly aggregates. Where appropriate, boroughs are encouraged to make provision for the working of economically viable deposits. Mitigating measures to minimise unavoidable adverse effects, such as site restoration, aftercare and after-use, should be addressed.

LOCAL CONSIDERATIONS

8.10 The nature and appearance of the countryside in the Borough has been the result of gradual changes in farming practices and other influences over many centuries. However, more recent changes in land management, government encouragement to take some agricultural land out of production, diversification, alternative uses for buildings in the countryside, and pressure for outdoor recreation, leisure and commercial uses, mean that changes in the Green Belt are more rapid and noticeable. Competing demands, which put pressure on the Green Belt, will need to be assessed against the guidance in PPG2 and the policies set out in this chapter.

8.11 Important local issues affecting the use of the Green Belt are the growth of horse-related activities, sub-division of agricultural units, changes in use of buildings, and the potential loss of good agricultural land to other uses.

8.12 Within the built up area the limited amount of land for building, in particular for housing, in combination with the restrictive policies relating to Green Belt and MOL, places the smaller open spaces under increasing pressure for development. It is widely recognised that such open spaces are essential to the character and functioning of the urban areas, and that their loss would make for a much less attractive living environment. There is pressure in particular to find economic new uses for redundant company sports grounds. The policies in the UDP are intended to protect these smaller urban sites and control development associated with their use or re-use in such a way that the open nature of the sites is preserved.

THE GREEN BELT

POLICY G1

Within the Green Belt, as defined on the Proposals Map, permission will not be given for inappropriate development unless very special circumstances can be demonstrated that clearly outweigh the harm by reason of inappropriateness or any other harm.

The construction of new buildings or extensions to buildings on land falling within the Green Belt will be inappropriate, unless it is for the following purposes:

(i) agriculture and forestry (unless permitted development rights have been withdrawn);
(ii) essential facilities for outdoor sport and outdoor recreation and open air facilities and other uses of land which preserve the openness of the Green Belt and do not conflict with the purposes of including land in it;
(iii) limited extension, alteration or replacement of existing dwellings;
(iv) limited infilling or redevelopment in accordance with the guidance in PPG2 Annex C within the designated major developed sites at Biggin Hill Airport and Cheyne Centre, Woodland Way, West Wickham.

The material change of use of land, engineering and other operations within the Green Belt will be inappropriate unless they maintain the openness and do not conflict with the purposes of including land in the Green Belt.

The re-use of a building in the Green Belt will be inappropriate unless it meets all of the following criteria:

(v) it will not have a materially greater impact than the present use on the open character of the land;
(vi) use of the land surrounding the building and boundary treatments will not harm the openness of the land or conflict with the purposes of including land in the Green Belt;
(vii) the building is of permanent construction and capable of conversion or re-use without extensive or complete reconstruction;
(viii) the form, bulk and design of the building are in keeping with its surroundings;
(ix) the proposed use does not entail external storage of materials, plant or machinery; and
(x) the proposed use has no adverse effect on the recreational enjoyment or appearance of the countryside.

The openness and visual amenity of the Green Belt shall not be injured by any proposals for development within or conspicuous from the Green Belt which might be visually detrimental by reasons of scale, siting, materials or design.

8.13 The appropriate uses referred to in Policy G1 accord with the guidance given in PPG2 (para 3.4). The restriction of new development to those uses will enable the main purposes of the Green Belt, referred to in para 8.3 above and in PPG2, to be fulfilled. Development which falls outside the appropriate uses is, by definition, harmful to the Green Belt. It is for the applicant to show what very special circumstances exist to warrant permission being granted. Such circumstances justifying inappropriate development will not exist unless the harm by reason of inappropriateness, and any other harm, is clearly outweighed by other considerations. In view of the presumption against inappropriate development, the Secretary of State will attach substantial weight to the harm to the Green Belt when considering any planning application or appeal concerning such development (PPG2 para. 3.2).

8.14 The Green Belt in Bromley includes some isolated pockets of residential development. It is not intended to permit any further new development in the villages located within Bromley.

8.15 PPG2 recognises that Green Belts often contain existing major developed sites (e.g. hospitals, airfields) which may be in continuing use or be redundant. If such a major developed site is specifically identified in the UDP, infilling or redevelopment which meets certain criteria is not inappropriate development. Such development should have no greater impact on the green belt than the existing development. Infilling means the filling of small gaps between built development. The Council will have regard to the detailed criteria set out in PPG2 Annex C in determining applications relating to proposals with the designated MDSs.

8.16 The majority of Biggin Hill Airport is located in the Green Belt and has been identified as a major developed site for the purposes of PPG2 Annex C. Much of the site is open grassland, runways and taxiways, which allow both local and more distant views across the Airport. The control tower, hangars and other operational buildings (including the former RAF quarters with conservation area status) occupy the perimeters of the Airport to the west and south and to a lesser extent in the east. Infilling and redevelopment within the MDS, having regard to the advice in PPG2 Annex C and the detailed policies in Chapter 12 of the UDP, will need to reconcile Green Belt and amenity objectives with the Airport's activities and operations.

8.17 Where proposals are designed for or are necessary to achieve compliance with new environmental, hygiene or welfare legislation, the need for the development will be taken into account in determining planning permission.

See also: Policies G4, BH2, & BH4 to BH6 inclusive

 

METROPOLITAN OPEN LAND

POLICY G2

Within Metropolitan Open Land (MOL) as defined on the Proposals Map, permission will not be given for inappropriate development unless very special circumstances can be demonstrated that clearly outweigh the harm by reason of inappropriateness or any other harm.

The construction of new buildings or for extensions to buildings on land falling within MOL will be inappropriate, unless it is for the following purposes:

(i) agriculture and forestry (unless permitted development rights have been withdrawn);
(ii) essential facilities for outdoor sport and outdoor recreation, cemeteries and other uses of land which preserve the openness of the MOL and do not conflict with the purposes of including land in it;
(iii) limited extensions, alterations or replacement of existing dwellings in accordance with Policies G4 and G5;
(iv) limited development for open air facilities that serve the whole or significant parts of London;
(v) limited infilling or redevelopment in accordance with the guidance in PPG2 Annex C within the designated major developed sites (MDS) at the National Sports Centre and the Bethlem Royal Hospital, with additional control at the National Sports Centre site in accordance with Policy G3.

The material change of use of land or engineering and other operations within MOL will be inappropriate unless they maintain the openness and do not conflict with the purposes of including land in MOL.

The re-use of a building in MOL will be inappropriate unless it meets all of the following criteria:

(vi) it will not have a materially greater impact than the present use on the open character of the land;
(vii) use of the land surrounding the building and boundary treatments will not harm the openness of the land or conflict with the purposes of including land in the MOL;
(viii) the building is of permanent construction and capable of conversion or re-use without extensive or complete reconstruction;
(ix) the form, bulk and design of the building are in keeping with its surroundings;
(x) the proposed use does not entail the external storage of materials, plant or machinery; and
(xi) the proposed use has no adverse effect on the recreational enjoyment of the MOL or on features of the land that are of metropolitan or national value.

The openness and visual amenity of the MOL shall not be injured by any proposals for development within or conspicuous from the MOL which might be visually detrimental by reasons of scale, siting, materials or design.

8.18 The MOL shown on the Proposals Map has been designated in accordance with the criteria set out in the London Plan (Policy 3D.9), namely:

• land which contributes to the physical structure of London by being clearly distinguishable from the built-up area
• land which includes open air facilities, especially for leisure, recreation, sport, arts and cultural activities and tourism which serve the whole or significant parts of London
• land which contains features or landscape of historic, recreational, nature conservation or habitat interest, of value at a metropolitan or national level
• land that forms part of a Green Chain and meets one of the above criteria.

8.19 The London Plan states that the MOL serves the same purpose as Green Belt and will be afforded the same level of protection. Given the recognition that there are similarities in the way MOL and Green Belts should be treated, inappropriate development in the MOL will not be approved except in very special circumstances and the approach set out in paragraph 8.13 applies equally to MOL. For the same reasons of parity, the Council considers that there is sufficient justification to apply the principle of major developed sites (MDS), as set out in Annex C PPG2, to two specific areas of MOL in Bromley. Where MDSs are identified, infilling or redevelopment meeting certain criteria will not be inappropriate development. In determining applications relating to MDSs the criteria in Annex C of PPG2 will be applied, in addition to the specific site related policy criteria, as in the case of the National Sports Centre MDS. Planning briefs will be prepared for each of the sites to guide their future development and redevelopment.

8.20 The Bethlem Royal Hospital occupies a substantial site on the western boundary of the borough on Monks Orchard Road. The portion of the site containing most of the hospital buildings has been identified as a major developed site for the purposes of PPG2 Annex C. The nature of the use is such that it requires various types of building each with its own discrete setting. Whilst the Council recognises the need for the hospital to build and adapt to the changing needs of the service provided, the site in its entirety represents an open space of metropolitan importance. The MDS designation should assist the Council in working with the NHS Trust to meet the needs of the patients using the facility, while ensuring that the impact of any limited infilling or re-development is minimised and continued protection is offered to the open land within which hospital buildings are set.

NATIONAL SPORTS CENTRE MAJOR DEVELOPED SITE

POLICY G3

Within the National Sports Centre, Crystal Palace Park MDS, as shown on the Proposals Map, in addition to complying with the Annex C PPG2 criteria, any infill or redevelopment proposal should:

(i) improve the openness of the Park or have no greater impact on the purposes of including the NSC land and the Park in MOL;
(ii) not exceed the height of the existing National Sports Centre building or the athletics stadium;
(iii) enhance the visual amenities of the Park landscape;
(iv) contribute to the achievement of the objectives for the long term regeneration of the Park, including integration with the parkland surroundings; and
(v) be restricted for indoor or outdoor sporting uses only, with facilities ancillary to those primary uses.

8.21 The National Sports Centre (NSC) occupies the core of Crystal Palace Park. The Park is designated MOL and the NSC complex, including an athletics stadium, covered sports hall and swimming pool, residential accommodation and car parking, is identified as a Major Developed Site for the purposes of PPG2 Annex C. The covered sports hall and swimming pool is a Grade II* listed building but is in need of upgrading. The lease of the NSC was transferred to the London Development Agency in March 2006. The LDA have prepared a draft Planning Framework for Crystal Palace Park which includes suggestions for the enhancement or redevelopment of the sporting facilities at the NSC. Consultations continue with the Mayor of London, English Heritage, Sport England and the local community. The site is identified as a major developed site for the purposes of PPG2 Annex C. A planning framework will be prepared in consultation with the Mayor of London, English Heritage, Sport England and the local community.

DWELLINGS IN THE GREEN BELT OR ON METROPOLITAN OPEN LAND

POLICY G4

Extensions or alterations to dwelling houses in the Green Belt or Metropolitan Open and (MOL) will only be permitted if:

(i) the net increase in the floor area over that of the original dwelling house is no more than 10%, as ascertained by external measurement; and
(ii) their size, siting, materials and design do not harm visual amenities or the open or rural character of the locality; and
(iii) the development does not result in a significant detrimental change in the overall form, bulk or character of the original dwellinghouse.

Proposals to extend converted or replacement dwellings will not normally be permitted.

This policy relates to proposals for extensions, alterations or outbuildings, which are to be sited within 5m of the existing dwelling house. Other development within the curtilage is inappropriate by definition and would only be permitted where very special circumstances have been demonstrated.

8.22 The Council wishes to ensure that there is no incremental harm to the Green Belt or MOL by excessive subsequent extensions to dwellings within the Green Belt or MOL that collectively may jeopardise the open nature of the countryside, or other open land.

8.23 The 'original dwelling' in the context of this policy follows the definition of 'original building' in the Town & Country Planning (General Permitted Development) Order 1995: ‘in relation to a building existing on 1st July 1948, as existing on that date and, in relation to a building built on or after 1st July 1948, as so built’.

8.24 The resultant floor area of the dwelling house referred to will include any development or ancillary buildings within 5m, which are treated as extensions to the dwelling house in the Town & Country Planning (General Permitted Development) Order 1995.

8.25 Where development is permitted, it will be subject to other policies of the UDP addressing the design and landscaping of proposals in the countryside.

8.26 The policy will not apply to dwellings that have been created by re-use of a building within the Green Belt.

POLICY G5

Where a building is in residential use in the Green Belt or on Metropolitan Open Land (MOL), the Council will permit its replacement by a new dwelling providing that:

(i) the resultant dwelling (including garaging and any accommodation below ground) does not result in a material net increase in floor area compared with the existing dwelling as ascertained by external measurement; and
(ii) the size, siting, materials and design of the replacement dwelling and of any associated works (such as boundary fences or walls) does not harm visual amenities or the open or rural character of the locality.

Proposals to replace re-used or converted buildings will not be permitted.

8.27 The existing dwelling is as defined in paragraph 8.23 above and will include any development or ancillary buildings within 5m which are treated as extensions to the dwelling house in the General Permitted Development Order 1995. Any proposals for garage facilities or basements associated with the replacement building are to be included in the redevelopment scheme, and any subsequent proposals for garaging that require planning permission will be assessed against Policies G1 & G2, as appropriate. In general, an increase of over 10% would be considered material, though this may depend also on design issues.

LAND ADJOINING GREEN BELT OR METROPOLITAN OPEN LAND

POLICY G6

A development proposal on land abutting either the Green Belt or Metropolitan Open Land (MOL), will not be permitted if it is detrimental to the visual amenity, character or nature conservation value of the adjacent designated area.

8.28 There are many properties with large gardens or extensive grounds adjoining the Green Belt or MOL. The Council wishes to see such land retained as a buffer between built development and the open land, to ensure that both the character and visual amenity of the Green Belt fringe and MOL sites is maintained. While in many cases extensive gardens represent the majority of the land to be protected, any sites considered to be of visual or ecological importance to Green Belt or MOL will be subject to this policy.

See also: Policy NE4

 

SOUTH EAST LONDON GREEN CHAIN

POLICY G7

Development proposals will be required to respect and not harm the character or function of the Green Chain and the Green Chain Walk, as defined on the Proposals Map. Measures to protect this designated area are to include the use of suitable screening, landscaping or in appropriate areas the planting of native vegetation and enhancing of wildlife habitats.

8.29 The Council will protect land within the Green Chain, as defined on the Proposals Map, and promote it as a recreational resource whilst conserving and, where appropriate, enhancing the landscape. The South East London Green Chain comprises a number of open spaces in a variety of ownerships and largely in recreational use, which extend in a virtually continuous arc from the Thames, through the London Boroughs of Bexley, Greenwich, Lewisham and Bromley. The boroughs jointly administer the Green Chain in accordance with the objectives in the Green Policy Document, agreed by the South East London Green Chain Joint Committee in 1977. The well-established partnership between boroughs maintains the Green Chain as a valuable recreational amenity, landscape and nature conservation reserve for the wider south east London area.

8.30 The concept of "Green Chains" is recognised and incorporated into The London Plan (para 3.250 and Policy 3D10). Paragraph 3.250 states that:

“Green Chains are important to London’s open space network, recreation and biodiversity. They consist of footpaths and the open spaces that they link, which are accessible to the public. Because of their London wide significance, the open spaces and the links within a Green Chain should be designated as MOL.”

8.31 A series of signposted walking routes has been established through the Green Chain; the sections running through Bromley are shown on the Proposals Map. In addition to providing a recreational route, this walk effectively ties together the separate open space sites giving the Green Chain a sense of cohesion. This walk also forms part one of London's strategic walking routes, the 'Capital Ring'.

See also: Policies NE4 and L2

 

URBAN OPEN SPACE

POLICY G8

Proposals for built development in areas defined on the Proposals Map as Urban Open Space (UOS), will be permitted only under the following circumstances:

(i) the development is related to the existing use (in this context, neither residential nor indoor sports development will normally be regarded as being related to the existing use); or
(ii) the development is small scale and supports the outdoor recreational uses or children's play facilities on the site; or
(iii) any replacement buildings do not exceed the site coverage of the existing development on the site.

Where built development is involved; the Council will weigh any benefits being offered to the community, such as new recreational or employment opportunities, against a proposed loss of open space.

In all cases, the scale, siting, and size of the proposal should not unduly impair the open nature of the site.

8.32 The London Plan recognises the importance of locally important open spaces to the local communities within the built-up area. It is left to individual Councils to identify the sites and decide upon the approach to be adopted in protecting them. PPG17 provides guidance in respect of the protection of open space, and the circumstances when its development may be regarded as appropriate.

8.33 The Council considers that the numerous open spaces within the urban area, not already defined as Metropolitan Open Land, also require protection. The areas that have been identified as UOS are considered to be of local significance. Not all of them have public access, but they nevertheless fulfil specific functions within their localities and provide important breaks within the built-up area. In so doing, they make a significant contribution to the residential environment. The sites comprise a variety of uses, the main ones being private and public recreational open space, schools, playing fields and allotments.

8.34 The primary purpose of this policy is to protect the open character of these smaller open spaces. Clause (i) of the policy recognises that additions or extensions may be necessary, provided that they are related to and essential for the function of the existing main use. In this context, residential and indoor sports development will not be regarded as acceptable, related uses.

8.35 On sites where there are no buildings, proposals associated with the functioning of outdoor sports or small-scale children's indoor play facilities may be permitted under clause (ii), provided that the predominantly open nature of the site is not impaired. Children's play facilities would supplement existing outdoor play areas, particularly in the winter, as well as encouraging greater use of the open spaces in which they were located.

8.36 Clause (iii) applies in cases where existing school or sports buildings have become redundant or no longer meet the standards of facilities expected by users. In such cases, any proposed replacement buildings should not cover more of the site than the existing buildings, and, although the position of the development within the site may be altered the siting of buildings should not unduly impair the open nature of the site.

8.37 In all cases, the acceptability of any proposal will be dependent on its scale in relation to the size of the open space.

See also: Policies NE3

 

POLICY G9

Development that complies with the requirements of Policy G1 but will lead to the loss of the best and most versatile agricultural land will be expected to be designed to allow for future economic re-use of the land for agriculture.

8.38 The London Plan (Policy 3D.14) requires boroughs to provide for the protection of the best and most versatile agricultural land in accordance with national guidance, and allow for appropriate projects for farm diversification. PPS7 (paras 28 and 29) defines best and most versatile land and states that the grade of agricultural land should be taken into account when planning applications are being considered, but alongside numerous other sustainability considerations.

See also: Policy NE12

 

DEVELOPMENT RELATED TO FARM DIVERSIFICATION

POLICY G10

Development related to farm diversification schemes will not normally be permitted unless:

(i) there is evidence that the wider benefits of farm diversification contribute to the very special circumstances required by Policy G1;
(ii) the scheme proposed preserves the openness of the Green Belt and does not conflict with the purposes of including land in it; and
(iii) there is no harm to the retail viability of nearby shops or to existing rural businesses.

8.39 Rural areas are becoming less reliant on the agricultural industry as a form of livelihood. While not overriding Green Belt policies, this policy allows farmers to look beyond traditional agricultural practice to supplement their incomes. The Council will expect farm diversification schemes to be well-conceived and consistent in scale to their rural and Green Belt locations. Potential diversification projects could include woodland management, farm shops, equestrian businesses, sporting facilities, nature trails and craft workshops. The Council will expect the applicant to explore the possibility of re-using or replacing existing buildings where feasible. Farm shops that sell a significant amount of produce from elsewhere is a separate use and requires planning permission.

AGRICULTURAL DWELLINGS

POLICY G11

When considering applications for agricultural workers' dwellings, the Council will require to be satisfied that:

(i) there is a clearly established existing need for an agricultural dwelling;
(ii) the need relates to a full-time worker, or one who is primarily employed in agriculture, and does not relate to a part-time requirement;
(iii) the unit and the agricultural activity concerned have been established for at least 3 years, have been profitable for at least one of them, and are currently financially sound, and have a clear prospect of remaining so;
(iv) the need for accommodation could not be fulfilled by another dwelling on the unit, or other existing accommodation in the area (including living in the adjoining/nearby built up area) which is suitable and available for occupation by the workers concerned;
(v) the size of the dwelling is commensurate with the established functional requirement; and
(vi) all other planning requirements are satisfied.

POLICY G12

When considering applications for temporary agricultural workers' dwellings, the Council will require to be satisfied that:

(i) there is clear evidence of a firm intention and ability to develop the enterprise concerned;
(ii) there is a functional need;
(iii) there is clear evidence that the proposed enterprise has been planned on a sound financial basis;
(iv) the functional need could not be fulfilled by another dwelling on the unit, or any other existing accommodation in the area (including living in the adjoining/nearby built-up area) which is suitable and available for occupation by the workers concerned;
(v) the size of the dwelling is commensurate with the established functional requirement; and
(vi) all other planning requirements are satisfied.

POLICY G13

Occupancy conditions for agricultural workers' dwellings in the countryside will only be removed when it is demonstrated that the dwelling is no longer needed, now and for the foreseeable future, for someone solely, mainly or last working in agriculture on the holding and in the dwelling's general locality. Where such conditions are removed, permission will not normally be granted for new agricultural or forestry workers' dwellings on the holding or on any new holding created by its sub-division.

8.40 Annex A of PPS7 sets the provisions under which such dwellings should be allowed; these policies have been framed to take these provisions into account. Advice is also given on a functional test to establish whether it is essential for the proper functioning of the enterprise, and, where it is shown that such a need exists, advice on occupancy conditions.

8.41 PPS7 gives examples of functional need as when workers are needed to be on hand day and night in connection with animals or agricultural processes or to deal with possible emergencies that could lead to loss of products or crops.

8.42 If permission for temporary accommodation (i.e. a mobile home) is granted, permission for a permanent dwelling will not subsequently be given unless the criteria set out in Policy G11 relating to agricultural functional need are met. Permission for a permanent extension to a temporary dwelling will not be acceptable.

8.43 Occupancy conditions will be applied to planning permissions for agricultural workers' dwellings (taking into account the advice in PPS7, Annex A paras 16 and 17), to ensure that the dwelling is retained for use by persons solely or last employed in agriculture in the locality and their resident dependants.

MINERALS WORKINGS AND ASSOCIATED DEVELOPMENT

POLICY G14

In considering planning applications for mineral extraction, the Council will require assurance that:

(i) the quality and quantity of the mineral concerned is such that any working would be economically viable;
(ii) any associated development to be located on the site is essential to the viability of the proposal; and
(iii) the land will be restored to an appropriate Green Belt use when extraction is complete.

POLICY G15

The Council will seek to ensure that the effects of mineral extraction, including associated development and generated traffic are minimised. Proposals will be required to meet each of the following criteria, where appropriate:

(i) best and most versatile agricultural land (as defined in Policy G9) must be capable of being restored to, or close to, its former undisturbed physical characteristics;
(ii) no long term effects on the landscape should result, and the short term effects must be minimised; and
(iii) restoration should be carried out to a high standard.

8.44 Planning applications for mineral extraction will be screened to determine whether they require an Environmental Impact Assessment, in line with the Town and Country Planning (Environmental Impact Assessment) Regulations 1999.

8.45 Mineral extraction is an activity that causes considerable disruption and can have widespread effects on local residential and visual amenity, landscapes, nature conservation interests, existing uses, transport networks, and safety. Under such circumstances, it is important for both the Council and the local community to be assured that any associated development will be kept to the minimum, and that the restoration of the land to a high standard will take place.

8.46 MPG1 suggests that 'preferred areas' be identified in the UDP. In Bromley, because of the lack of knowledge in respect of the extent, nature, and location of deposits, it is not possible to show areas on the Proposals Map. It is assumed, however, that any workable deposits will lie beneath Green Belt land and will therefore be safeguarded against surface development, which would preclude their exploitation at a future date.

8.47 Restoration of land affected by mineral workings is a very important factor, and one that will be considered at an early stage in the planning process. The Council will expect the highest standards to be attained in this respect, and the use to which the restored land is put to accord with the appropriate policies of this plan and the guidance on ‘aftercare’ in MPG7. In particular, restoration and aftercare should provide the means to maintain or enhance the long-term quality of the land and landscapes taken for mineral extraction. Reclamation can also provide opportunities for creating or enhancing sites for nature conservation. To ensure these standards are achieved, any permission will be subject to a legal agreement.

See also: Policy NE12

 

Go to previous page Previous Chapter Top of PageGo to top of page Next Chapter Go to next page